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Global Problems Can be Solved

U.S. Measles Outbreaks Highlight Global Need

American Red Cross, UN Foundation site trends indicating measles risk remains high

April 17, 2009

Editors note: Interviews with technical experts leading the Measles Initiative can be arranged throughout the weekend and in the event of future outbreaks.

Recent measles cases in four states – California, Pennsylvania, Maryland and Iowa – highlight the growing number of unvaccinated adults and children living in the United States as well as the need to control the global spread of the disease.

While this highly-contagious virus was eliminated from the Americas in 2002, imported cases trigger outbreaks among unvaccinated persons in the United States. Last year, the number of reported measles cases in the United States more than doubled (63, on average, to 140 total in 2008). Parents, who choose not to vaccinate their children, overlook the fact that measles is still common in many countries and kills an estimated 540 children each day.

Despite the fact that a safe and effective measles vaccine costs less than $1, parents in many developing countries do not have access to immunization services that would protect their children.  Factors such as poverty, poor health systems and a lack of information make it difficult for families to secure preventative medical care.

"As long as measles remains an issue for one nation, it remains a threat to all," said Athalia Christie, senior technical advisor with the American Red Cross.

The Measles Initiative – a partnership led by the American Red Cross, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, United Nations Foundation, UNICEF, and the World Health Organization – is working to address this problem.

The Initiative, formed in 2001, has invested $670 million in measles control activities, helping to save an estimated 3.6 million lives. A strategy to reduce global measles mortality, which includes vaccinating all children before their first birthday through routine health services and mass campaigns, has been key to securing a 74 percent reduction in global measles deaths (2000-2007). More than 600 million children in 60 countries have been vaccinated through the Measles Initiative.

For additional information, the public can be directed to www.measlesinitiative.org.

Following are statements issued by the Measles Initiative technical advisors:

"Measles knows no borders but can be prevented worldwide for less than $1 per child.  We must be steadfast in our efforts to reduce measles cases globally. As long as children remain unvaccinated, they are at risk."
—Andrea Gay, Executive Director of Children's Health, United Nations Foundation

"It is essential that all children – regardless of where they are born – have the opportunity to be vaccinated against measles, so that they can grow up healthier and without fear of this highly-contagious, but entirely preventable disease."
Athalia Christie, Senior Technical Advisor, American Red Cross

Media Contacts:

Abi Weaver, American Red Cross  (202) 303-5551, weaverab@usa.redcross.org

Amy DiElsi, United Nations Foundation   (202) 419-3230, adielsi@unfoundation.org

 
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